Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

2. Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)

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2. Basis of Presentation and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Policies)
3 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2017
Notes to Financial Statements  
Basis of Presentation

The accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in all material respects in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial information. Pursuant to the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”), certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in annual consolidated financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP have been condensed or omitted.

 

Because certain information and footnote disclosures have been condensed or omitted, these unaudited consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and related notes contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016, as amended (the “2016 Form 10-K”) as filed with the SEC. In management’s opinion, all normal and recurring adjustments considered necessary for a fair presentation of the financial position, results of operations and cash flows for the periods presented have been included. Management believes that the disclosures made in these unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements are adequate to make the information not misleading. The results of operations for the interim periods presented are not necessarily indicative of the results for the entire year.

 

Effective January 1, 2017, the Company changed the manner in which it accounts for federal and state universal service fees and surcharges in its consolidated statement of operations. The Company now includes the amounts collected in revenues, and reports the associated costs in cost of revenues, and this change has been applied retrospectively in the Company’s consolidated financial statements for all periods presented. As a result, both the Company’s revenues and cost of revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016 include $0.7 million and $0.6 million, respectively, of governmental fees and surcharges.

 

During the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, comprehensive loss was equal to the net loss amounts presented for the respective periods in the accompanying condensed consolidated interim statements of operations. Also, as discussed further below, effective January 1, 2017 the Company early adopted Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-18, Restricted Cash.

Liquidity

Since inception, the Company has incurred significant net losses. At March 31, 2017, the Company had a working capital deficit of $8.8 million and stockholders’ equity of $6.9 million. At December 31, 2016, the Company had a working capital deficit of $6.6 million and stockholders’ equity of $9.2 million. The Company’s consolidated cash balance at March 31, 2017 was $6.6 million. While the Company believes it has sufficient cash to fund its operations and meet its operating and debt obligations for the next twelve months, it may be required to either raise additional capital, limit its discretionary capital expenditures or borrow amounts available under its revolving credit facility to support its business plan. There is currently no commitment for any additional funding and there can be no assurances that funds will be available on terms that are acceptable to the Company, or at all.

Principles of Consolidation

The condensed consolidated interim financial statements include the accounts of Fusion and each of its wholly-owned subsidiaries. All intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of condensed consolidated interim financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the condensed consolidated interim financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods. On an on-going basis, the Company evaluates its estimates, including, but not limited to, those related to recognition of revenue, allowance for doubtful accounts; fair value measurements of its financial instruments; useful lives of its long-lived assets used in computing depreciation and amortization; impairment assessment of goodwill and intangible assets; accounting for stock options and other equity awards, particularly related to fair value estimates, accounting for income taxes, contingencies and litigation. Changes in the facts or circumstances underlying these estimates could result in material changes and actual results could differ from those estimates.

Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on deposit and short-term, highly-liquid investments with maturities of three months or less on the date of purchase. As of March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016, the carrying value of cash and cash equivalents approximates fair value due to the short period to maturity.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

At March 31, 2017, the carrying value of the Company’s accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued expenses approximates its fair value due to the short term nature of these financial instruments.

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company periodically reviews long-lived assets, including intangible assets, for possible impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. If an impairment indicator is present, the Company evaluates recoverability by a comparison of the carrying amount of the assets to future undiscounted net cash flows expected to be generated by the assets.  If the carrying value of the asset exceeds the projected undiscounted cash flows, the Company is required to estimate the fair value of the asset and recognize an impairment charge to the extent that the carrying value of the asset exceeds its estimated fair value. The Company did not record any impairment charges during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, as there were no indicators of impairment.

Goodwill

Goodwill is the excess of the acquisition cost of a business combination over the fair value of the identifiable net assets acquired. Goodwill at March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016 was $35.3 million and $35.7 million, respectively.  All of the Company’s goodwill is attributable to its Business Services segment.  

 

The following table presents the changes in the carrying amounts of goodwill during the three months ended March 31, 2017:

 

Balance at December 31, 2016   $ 35,689,215  
Increase in goodwill associated with a 2016 acquisition     7,414  
Adjustment to goodwill associated with acquisition of customer bases (see note 3)     (410,000 )
Balance at March 31, 2017   $ 35,286,629  

 

Goodwill is not amortized and is tested for impairment on an annual basis in the fourth quarter of each fiscal year and whenever events or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount.

 

The impairment test for goodwill uses a two-step approach, which is performed at the reporting unit level.  The Company has determined that its reporting units are its operating segments (see note 15) since that is the lowest level at which discrete, reliable financial and cash flow information is available.  Step one compares the fair value of the reporting unit (calculated using a market approach and/or a discounted cash flow method) to its carrying value.  If the carrying value exceeds the fair value, there is a potential impairment and step two must be performed.  Step two compares the carrying value of the reporting unit’s goodwill to its implied fair value, which is the fair value of the reporting unit less the fair value of the unit’s assets and liabilities, including identifiable intangible assets.  If the implied fair value of goodwill is less than its carrying amount, an impairment is recognized.

 

In testing goodwill for impairment, the Company has the option to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether the existence of events or circumstances leads to a determination that it is more likely than not (more than 50%) that the estimated fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. If the Company elects to perform a qualitative assessment and determines that an impairment is more likely than not, it is then required to perform a quantitative impairment test. The Company also may elect not to perform the qualitative assessment and, instead, proceed directly to the quantitative impairment test. The Company did not record any impairment charges related to goodwill during the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016.

Advertising and Marketing Costs

Advertising and marketing expense includes cost for promotional materials and trade show expenses for the marketing of the Company’s products and services.  Advertising and marketing expenses were $0.1 million and $0.7 million for the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively, and are reflected in selling, general and administrative expenses in the Company’s condensed consolidated statements of operations.

Income Taxes

The accounting and reporting requirements with respect to accounting for income taxes require an asset and liability approach. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are computed for differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities that will result in future taxable or deductible amounts, based on enacted tax laws and rates applicable to the periods in which the differences are expected to affect taxable income. Valuation allowances are established, when necessary, to reduce deferred income tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

 

In accordance with U.S. GAAP, the Company is required to determine whether a tax position of the Company is more likely than not to be sustained upon examination by the applicable taxing authority, including resolution of any related appeals or litigation processes, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefit to be recognized is measured as the largest amount of benefit that is greater than fifty percent likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. Derecognition of a tax benefit previously recognized could result in the Company recording a tax liability that would reduce net assets. Based on its analysis, the Company has determined that it has not incurred any liability for unrecognized tax benefits as of March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016. The Company is subject to income tax examinations by major taxing authorities for all tax years since 2013 and its tax returns may be subject to review and adjustment at a later date based on factors including, but not limited to, on-going analyses of and changes to tax laws, regulations and interpretations thereof. No interest expense or penalties have been recognized as of March 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016. During the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, the Company recognized no adjustments for uncertain tax positions.

Stock-Based Compensation

The Company recognizes expense for its employee stock-based compensation based on the fair value of the awards at the date of grant. The fair values of stock options are estimated at the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option valuation model. The use of the Black-Scholes option valuation model requires the input of subjective assumptions. Compensation cost, net of estimated forfeitures, is recognized ratably over the vesting period of the related stock-based compensation award. For transactions in which goods or services are received from non-employees in return for the issuance of equity instruments, the expense is recognized in the period when the goods and services are received at the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more readily determinable.

New and Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

In November 2016, the Financial Accounting Standard Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2016-18, Restricted Cash, which clarifies guidance and presentation related to restricted cash in the statement of cash flows, including stating that restricted cash should be included within cash and cash equivalents in the statement of cash flows. The standard is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted, and is to be applied retrospectively. The Company early adopted ASU 2016-18 effective January 1, 2017. Adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-2, Leases, which is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2018 with early adoption permitted. Under ASU 2016-02, lessees will be required to recognize for all leases at the commencement date a lease liability, which is a lessee’s obligation to make lease payments arising from a lease measured on a discounted basis, and a right –to-use asset, which is an asset that represents the lessee’s right to use or control the use of a specified asset for the lease term. The Company is currently evaluating the effect that the new guidance will have on its financial statements and related disclosures.

 

In November 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-17, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes (ASU 2015-17), which simplifies the presentation of deferred income taxes by requiring that deferred tax assets and liabilities be classified as noncurrent on the balance sheet. The updated standard is effective as of January 1, 2017. Adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Compensation – Stock Compensation, which is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2016. Under ASU 2016-09, all excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies related to share-based payment awards are to be recognized as income tax expense or income tax benefit in the statement of operations. In addition, the tax effects of exercised or vested awards should be treated as discrete items in the reporting period in which they occur and excess tax benefits should be recognized regardless of whether the benefit reduces taxes payable in the current period. Adoption of this standard did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In May 2014, FASB issued guidance that outlines a single comprehensive model for entities to use in accounting for revenue arising from contracts with customers and supersedes most recent current revenue recognition guidance, including industry-specific guidance. The core principle of the revenue model is that an entity recognizes revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. The guidance also specifies the accounting for certain incremental costs of obtaining a contract and costs to fulfill a contract with a customer. Entities have the option of applying either a full retrospective approach to all periods presented or a modified approach that reflects differences prior to the date of adoption as an adjustment to equity. In April 2015, FASB deferred the effective date of this guidance until January 1, 2018 and the Company is currently assessing the impact of this guidance on its consolidated financial statements.